Honeysuckle Syrup

It’s April, which means Masters week (a big golf tournament in Augusta) is over, the tourists are gone, our garden has been planted, and honeysuckle is everywhere…

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Along the garden fence to attract the bees.
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The smell is incredible.  Takes me right back to childhood when I lived in a neighborhood and all of us kids would take our little sips of honey off the vine in front of the mean old lady’s house.  Every neighborhood has a resident “mean old lady”, right?
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On my walk to the rain barrel.
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Climbing the trees around the blackberry patch.  Literally, it’s EVERYWHERE.

I love everything about it:  the scent, the fact that is attracts the bees which pollinate our garden and take it back to hives to make honey, not to mention its beauty.  It’s also super invasive so we spend time hacking a lot down at the end of the season to prevent it overtaking everything.  We’re not really winning that battle but I’m certainly not mad!

It takes me right back to spring and summer during my childhood and I think every Southern girl wishes we could bottle up the scent and the taste fresh off the vine.

Last year I made this honeysuckle breeze cake  for my dad-in-law’s birthday and enjoyed that rich sweet taste baked in to the cake.

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No caption, just drool.

This year, I decided to and bottle up that taste for our sweet tea by making a simple syrup!

A simple syrup is exactly that:  a simple mix of sugar dissolved in water to create a syrup.  You can add certain elements to the sugar water to give it a unique flavor; in this case it’s honeysuckle.

My husband’s reaction after trying it in his sweet tea for the first time: “It tastes just like it smells!”

That basically means it tastes like summertime in Heaven, y’all.

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I started by collecting two cups loosely packed honeysuckle blossoms, making sure the green stem at the bottom was removed (it can create a bitter taste) and brushing off excess dirt.

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Once that was done, I brought 1 1/3 cups sugar and 1 cup water to a boil, stirring until the sugar was completely dissolved.

I packed the honeysuckle down in to a pint mason jar and poured the hot sugar water over the blossoms.

Once the jar reached room temperature, I placed it in the refrigerator for 8 hours to let the blossoms flavor the water.

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Next, I placed a strainer over top of a clean pint mason jar and poured the syrup in to the new jar, discarding the dirt/debris and honeysuckle blossoms.

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We’re left with this lovely jar of honeysuckle syrup!  You can cover and refrigerate for a couple of weeks – if it lasts that long!  I use around 3 teaspoons of syrup for a pint jar full of sweet tea but you can play with the amount until you get the flavor you want.

You could also use this syrup in a batter to add the flavor to pancakes, madeleines, or sweet breads.

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Honeysuckle Syrup

  • 2 cups honeysuckle blossoms, greenery removed
  • 1 1/3 cups sugar
  • 1 cup water
  1. Pick your honeysuckle; remove green stems and shake off dirt.
  2. Boil your sugar and water; stirring until sugar is completely dissolved.
  3. Pour the hot sugar water over the packed honeysuckle in a pint mason jar and bring to room temperature.
  4. Place covered jar in the refrigerator for at least 8 hours.
  5. Pour contents through a strainer in to a clean pint mason jar, discarding blossoms and debris.
  6. Cover and refrigerate up to 2 weeks.

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