Happening in Leseberg Holler (with a Meat Flock Update)

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Fall has always been my favorite time of year here.  I think the picture above of my walk to the chicken coop explains why!

We’re busy flipping through seed catalogs and preparing to start some of our plants indoors from seeds we saved from the summer garden, raking leaves for the compost pile, and loving on our new baby goats!

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The only raking we do around here is for the compost pile or to keep the chickens busy scratching around during the winter.  I almost lost Haven while taking a wheel barrow full to compost; luckily I spotted her leg kicking up out of the pile.

Hazel and Eloise were born November 21 and they came to our home, along with their mama Choca, on November 23.

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Haven and Eloise.
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Haven and Hazel.
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They are an adorable handful!
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This is mama Choca, nursing her babies.  She’s clearly not amused at my photo taking but she was thrilled with the collards I fed her afterward.  She’ll hang around until Hazel and Eloise are finished nursing and then she’ll go back to her home!

 

Our meat flock is now 11 weeks old!  If you’d like to read about how we prepared for and why we started a meat flock, read my first post here.

We moved the flock from the brooder to their coop on November 19 when they were 7 weeks old.

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The chicken coop
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Free ranging

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Unfortunately, a hawk found our flock on December 11 and we lost our first rooster.  The following day, the hawk came back for lunch and we lost a second rooster.
The evening of December 12, Joe and I created a fence around the coop with a cover until we’re able to trap and relocate the hawk (it’s illegal to harm a hawk so we are trying to do the right thing while keeping our chickens safe).  Unfortunately free ranging is over for now until that’s taken care of.

The chickens are weighing in at 3 1/2 pounds at 11 weeks old; they have been gaining around a half pound each week.

So far we have spent $132 on feed (we’ve purchased 450 lbs in bulk) and they have gone through 300 pounds of that food in just 11 weeks!

Another $145 was spent on brooder and coop supplies (these are one time only costs so this will not be a part of next year’s flock expenses thankfully!)

I’m keeping track of every penny spent on the flock so that I can share the grand total with you in February when processing begins and calculate exactly how much each bird cost us compared with grocery store chicken prices.

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